Leadership Book of Virtues: Personal Mission Statement

This semester I’m enrolled in Moral Dimensions of Leadership.  Every assignment in the course becomes part of our final artifact, a leadership book of virtues.  I will be sharing most portions of this book in order to effectively communicate my thoughts on moral leadership as well as to receive feedback on my writing and critical thinking.

My personal mission statement should serve as my statement of moral purpose (why I exist), as well as an illustration of what I hope to do and achieve.  I’ve been told it should be “infused with passion” to make it compelling, inspiring and energizing.

So, do you think I’ve created an effective mission statement?

I am an intelligent, driven woman with a passion for communication and technology.  Through continued study, collaboration, practice, writing and instruction, I will inspire higher education professionals to constantly reexamine how we communicate with students of all ages and backgrounds.  I want to see evolving communication techniques directly contribute to the attainment of educational goals and improve engagement among all members of the higher education community.

I welcome your feedback and constructive criticism.

Update: As I work on my self-assessment of my second year of my doctoral program, I looked at my mission statement again, and realized it had changed slightly since it was posted on this blog. My personal missions statement, in its current form, is:

I am an intelligent, driven woman with a passion for communication and technology. Through continued study, collaboration, practice, writing and instruction, I will inspire higher education professionals to constantly reexamine how we communicate. I want to see evolving communication techniques directly contribute to the attainment of educational goals and improve engagement among all members of the higher education community.

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6 Comments on “Leadership Book of Virtues: Personal Mission Statement

  1. I admire anyone and everyone who writes a mission statement and puts it out to the world. You ROCK!

    I get a sense from this about what you value in your professional life for sure, but I’m not yet getting the sense of you as a person. The analogy I always hear used is about your 90th Birthday Party. How do you want people to describe you when they are giving their toasts to honor you? Based on how well I know you in 140 characters or less and not yet IRL, I think there is more to Liz Gross than what you want to achieve in higher ed?

    • I actually struggled with that a lot. I’m supposed to keep this concise, so I’m not exactly sure how to weave my personal/professional mission together. I appreciate the feedback as I continue to revise my mission statement this weekend.

  2. Good for you — I don’t think I’ve EVER thought about a personal mission statement. Love being inspired by other higher ed professionals.

    Do you want to “reexamine” communication just with students or with students and other higher education colleagues? Given some of your background, I didn’t know if you wanted to expand that more. Beyond that, I think it’s GREAT!

    • good thought. I think I could take out “with students of all ages and backgrounds” to make the statement more inclusive and succinct.

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